Tips For Homeschooling Your Gifted Child

Many children go to school and find that it is not enough of a challenge for them. Being a gifted student can put children in a precarious position; either being bored at school because they aren’t being challenged, or being set ahead in their grade and risk the wrath of other children because of their brighter than average minds. Many parents of gifted children find that the best course of action is to home school their gifted child, in order to let them learn at their own pace.

In a public school system, your child only move as fast as the slowest student, essentially putting him or her far behind their potential. But before you pull your above-average child out of traditional school, or begin home schooling your bright kindergartner, there are some aspects that you should carefully consider.

As a gifted student, your child may require some extra curriculum, and extra curriculum will add to your cost as a homeschooler. While many children learn well using every day applications or minimal amounts of curriculum, your gifted student may thrive best on workbooks and extra books. While the public library should be able to alleviate some of the financial stress, you may find yourself purchasing more than you thought you would have to, therefore making homeschooling a sometimes expensive option.

Consider the effect that homeschooling will have on your gifted student socially. There is a good chance that because you have a gifted child, he or she already has trouble fitting in with general students or making friends. Traditional school is the traditional way to socialize your grade-schooler. If you find that your gifted student isn’t making friends while homeschooling, consider other homeschooling groups, sports and other activity groups in order to get your child out and making friends without the traditional school setting.

Finally, there is a lot of consideration that needs to go into how much time a parent can commit to the homeschooling of their gifted child. Even if your child requires minimum supervisions, homeschooling requires a generous time commitment from the parent in regards to curriculum planning, teaching and checking and supervising the work.

If you already have a lot on your plate and don’t think you can devote at least four hours per day to your child’s education, then perhaps a traditional school may still be your best option. Talk with your child’s teacher about ways to keep him or her challenged, and you may see him or her flourish in any learning setting.